left handed knitting and crocheting adventures
  Crochet Lessons
 
Left handed crochet


Let's start at the very beginning...remember, as always, practice really does make perfect!

Holding the Crochet Hook


Hold the hook between your thumb and forefinger of your dominant hand with the hook pointing back towards your thumbnail. This grip should be firm, but comfortable. You will find, as you become more comfortable, that your hook will find its own comfort zone.

Holding the Yarn


Having an even tension on the yarn is crucial to getting even stitches in crocheting. This is especially important if you are doing patterns that are size-specific, such as clothes. This picture shows the working loop being held between the thumb and middle finger of your right hand, looping over the index finger to control tension. Lace the yarn through the other fingers to also help with tension control and tangling. Again, as you work, you will find a comfort zone...nothing says you have to do it EXACTLY like this!


Beginning Loop


A slip knot is used as the beginning stitch. I usually insert my hook through the working loop in the opposite direction that I will work, twist, yarn over then pull it through the loop. Some people prefer to tie the knot by hand, then insert the hook to begin working.

Yarn Over


Abbreviation: yo

Yarn over means just that; you are twisting the yarn over the hook from front to back so that the hook catches it and can draw it through the loop.

Chain Stitch


Abbreviation: ch

The chain stitch is the most basic and is used to form the base row and rings. You simply yarn over and pull through the loop to make on stitch. Practice this until you can get a chain of uniform looking loops; its all about tension control and can be easier said than done!


Making a Ring


Abbreviation: r# (example: r5 is a chain of 5 stitches made into a ring.)

A ring is made of a desired number of chain stitches with one end attached to another. Chain the desired amount, then slip the hook through the beginning stitch. Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook. Rings are used to start blocks, such as Granny Squares, or can be used as decorations, such as a popcorn stitch.

Single Crochet


Abbreviation: sc

The term "crochet" involves picking up a loop or loops from a previous stitch. The term "single" tells you that you will yarn over and pull through the loops one time. Entire items can be made using this stitch, although it may not look very interesting. To do a single crochet, pick up the front AND back loops from the desired stitch (usually the next one unless specified), yarn over and pull through the loop.

Double Crochet


Abbreviation: dc

Here, you will yarn over, THEN pick up the FRONT loop of the desired stitch. Yarn over and pull through the first of the three loops on the hook. Yarn over again and pull through the remaining two loops on the hook. For a tight weave, dc in every stitch; for a looser weave, use every other stitch.

Half-Double Crochet


Abbreviation: hd

This begin just like the dc; you will yarn over, THEN pick up the FRONT loop of the desired stitch. Yarn over again and pull it through all three loops on the hook. For a tight weave, hd in every stitch; for a looser weave, use every other stitch.


Triple Crochet


Abbreviation: tc

Begin the triple crochet by yarning over twice, then pick up the front loop of the desired stitch. Yarn over again and draw it through the first two loops on the hook. Repeat this until all the loops are off the chain. For a tight weave, tc in every stitch; for a looser weave, use every other stitch.


Tying Off


Work and extra chain stitch, cut the end and pull it completely through the loop. Pull firmly on the end to create a knot.






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